• Support Our Early Childhood Educators
    Early childhood educators are at the frontline providing vital care and education for over 1.3 million children. But they are doing it tough. A decline in the number of children attending services means that some services will close their doors and educators will loose their jobs. EC educators required to self-isolate for their safety, the safety of the children in their care and the wider community – may loose their income. Job losses and service closures will have huge ramifications for educators, children, families and the Australian economy, now, and in the future. If we guarantee to support our educators now, the flow-on effect for children, families and childcare businesses, whether for-profit or non-profit, will be immense. It will keep people in jobs and not reliant on welfare. At this time of national crisis, and coinciding with the 30th anniversary of the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC), the need to keep Australian children’s early childhood education and care services working is never more pressing.
    167 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Sandie Wong Picture
  • “Say Hello with Namaste and Goodbye to Handshake”
    This is to (re)introduce very basic yet crucial health hygiene, as well as a beautiful way to greet people. (Please sign this campaign and take a moment to share it with others via email, social media or good old fashioned word of mouth.)
    23 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Pratap KATARYA
  • Saint Brigid's Primary School Camps
    The students look forward to their camps each year with much joy. School camp offers a structured opportunity for children to grow. This experience allows kids to become independent and self-confident, while socialising and making new friends, and even learning new skills. The children often look forward to this experience from grade prep through to when they are finally old enough to attend. Due to excess enrolment numbers Saint Brigid's Primary School has decided that grade three and five children will no longer be able to attend school camps. The school held a meeting with the students ‘about school camp’ recently. The grade three, four, five and six children were gathered together where they were told that for half of the children in the room there would be no camp, this was very upsetting for them. Many parents telling the story of children crying after school as they were so upset. The school has a view that the children will equally receive these opportunities with an ‘activity week’ at school is met with resistance from both students and parents. Although it will be a fun and rewarding experience, the children are unlikely to get the benefits and excitement of a camp. The locations of the planned camps are of disappointment also. With only two camps now offered in the children’s primary years it is disappointing that the ones on offer do not include either Sovereign Hill or Canberra. A school excursion to Canberra is considered a rite of passage for many Australian students. Students visit many attractions including the Museum of Australian Democracy, Parliament House, the High Court and, of course, a highlight for many — Questacon. More than 100,000 school students get first-hand knowledge of democracy and lawmaking on a visit to Parliament House every year, a truly unique and beneficial education experience – one that our children will no longer be offered. It is so disappointing to think that due to the growth in our school population our children will no longer be given the opportunity to: a. Participate in school camps for two of their four last years of primary school b. Visit Canberra and the unique education experience it (they will also not be attending Sovereign Hill in Ballarat – another important education experience for students). We would like the Saint Brigid's Primary School reconsider: • The cancellation of school camp for our grade 3 and 5 students. • The ceasing of a school camp to Canberra for our senior students.
    7 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Saint Brigid's Parents
  • Campaign for the removal of all gambling ads from Australian media
    Remove gambling enticement from young people Reduce harm done by people becoming addicted to gambling Improve the community in general We simply don't NEED gambling advertising, the industry does... and failure to remove it shows that our government is complicit in driving gambling addiction for profit.
    39 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Troy Love
  • No mobile phone tower in Sandown Park
    Sandown Park is a much loved Hobart recreational area. People come to wind down, walk their dogs, play some sport and to breathe the air. Telstra have decided to build a huge array of mobile phone antennae on an existing pole in the park relying on their own interpretation that this is low impact. They don’t want to ask the community what they think so the notice is buried in a small community newspaper. Please treat the community with respect, we care about the place we live in and the places we use to unwind in. Please don’t wreck our park. Note: No design or image of the proposed addition of 6 antennae on the pole has been provided so the third image is an example of a 6 antennae configuration. The image will be updated once provided by Telstra
    210 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Ruth Kearon Picture
  • It’s time for Climate Action
    Climate Change is a global crisis which needs to be urgently addressed, it is time to put politics aside and work together for the future. This is an opportunity for real and positive change let’s take it.
    21 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Felicity White
  • Warning signage urgently needed at Cape Byron / Cosy Corner goat track
    We call on these agencies to take urgent action, that will prevent other families going through the trauma and devastation of such an incident.
    1,959 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Kim Goodrick
  • Better canteen
    For all children living in Australia. Healthy nutrition at a young age will shape their future health and habits, it would support families will lower income and busy parents who have no time to spare cooking proper lunch for their kids. It will support the economy by using produces from local farmer, we could also cut on waste and teach kids to live a more ethical way.
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    Created by Helene Dunlop
  • Just when we thought our food was safe in SA
    When it comes to food safety concerns about GM crops we the people need to be consulted or at least all sides to the argument for yes or no need to be considered. It appears the Marshall Government are not interested in consultation, we need to let them know we, the consumers have a major stake in this issue. They are listening to those who have an agenda promoting the case for GM crops, it's our turn to deliver our message. No, don't GMO food in our state. Americans in their droves are now requesting organic food because they don't want GM sourced food, and their whole food system is now compromised. The negative past experiences of other countries who allowed GM crops is freely available for everyone to see. Russia and some EU countries have since banned GM because the risks to human health are too great. Separating GM crops from Non GM crops has proven a nonsensical idea and the hundreds of court cases re contamination confirm this. So what if SA misses out on research on GMO, we want to stay clean.
    410 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Trevor Hywood
  • Mothers work
    The economic disadvantage women face through child bearing and rearing is so engrained in our society that we accept it as the status quo. However Australia has one of the lowest number of paid maternity leave weeks ( and it is also conditional) . Instead of labelling this payment as “welfare” or “government handouts” let’s start a paradigm shift and look at it for what it really is; A redistribution of wealth for human capital, in support of women (and men) in a time of their lives when they need it most. It seems a strange but accepted throw back to the 1960’s that if you choose to raise your own children you become the economic responsibility of your significant other ( statistically speaking in a heterosexual relationship this is the man / husband). This lack of financial independence is not only distressing and oppressive, it affects all areas of life including negatively impacting maternal mental health, increasing stress on the relationship ( during an already stressful time ) and ultimately can affect the health and well being of the entire family unit. Lack of financial independence is also contributing factor to women experiencing domestic violence & their inability to escape their circumstances. If we were able to provide women with a level of financial support during the first year of their child’s life, we would not only be supporting the woman and child but be investing in a healthier, fairer more just society. For what mothers add to society in terms of a loving, nurturing and peaceful upbringing has far more value and unseen ripple effect then any economic system could ever be able to accurately measure or quantify.
    18 of 100 Signatures
    Created by jenna baturynsky
  • Say NO to Academic Restructuring at Flinders University
    What is presently happening in universities, not just at Flinders University but elsewhere, will have – and is having – serious social impacts. Put simply: • Troubled by decades of inequitable Federal funding cuts, universities, like Flinders, are transforming into businesses; • This changes the way we think about public education: from a vehicle for public good (i.e. to be invested in jointly by the state and commonwealth for collective good, and accessible to the broader community), to a commodity (paid for by individuals for private benefit); • These same governments are increasing support for the banks, the wealthy, the military and big corporations, while university managers are diverting much of the funds they do have, to upper management salaries and marketing campaigns while starving administrative support and teaching in many parts of the university; • Together, this impacts education and teaching. For example, within this ‘business’ formulation, academic subjects are considered valuable to the extent that they hold exchange value on the market. The hard sciences, for instance, are typically more valued by university managers for their amenability to industry partnerships and patents; • Subjects less amenable to outside funding; i.e., the humanities, social sciences, education, social work, arts, racial and ethnic or other minority studies, are increasingly devalued and are most at risk because they question power; • The latter fields are those where social inequalities have historically been most vigorously addressed (i.e. poverty, racism, gender inequalities). These are areas where students learn to think critically and care deeply about social equity. They are also areas where women academics are most highly concentrated, and these areas are current targets of the greatest and most casualised workforce; • Within this formulation, learning areas with highest market value (the ones that make the most money) are thus increasingly tied to outside corporate interests and funding, which in other parts of the world where this model has been applied, have given rise to ethical issues concerning ethics of research; • Rather than develop critical, social-democratic thinkers with social and political consciousness, with the shift from ‘public education’ to ‘private investment’, universities are destined to develop future generations of workers who are technically trained, yet self-interested, and our societies will be impoverished as a consequence. Universities have never been perfect institutions, but those like Flinders have had a proud record of making social equity a core part of their rationale. Current moves in higher education are deepening existing social inequalities, they are creating a precarious workforce that hurts minority groups the most, and they are positioning students-as-consumers who, if trends overseas are to be observed, will soon be subject to steeper tuition costs, making education an impossibility for many future students. Save our public universities, save our societies.
    494 of 500 Signatures
    Created by Nadine Schoen
  • Save Sam's Garden
    The garden plants on Drew Street are more than 10 metres from the corner of Daglish Street and we strongly disagree that these plants cause any sight obstructions to motorists. We ask you to hear the voices of your community and stop the planned destruction of our beloved Faerie Garden.
    286 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Renee Hiphiphooray Picture